The Key Characters and Critical Elements in Glass Castle Essay

The Key Characters and Critical Elements in Glass Castle Essay 

Description

After you finish reading one of the two books (Glass castle: Walls, J. (2006). The glass castle: A memoir. New York: Scribner. ISBN: 978-0-7432-4754-2 OR The other Wes More: Moore, W. (2011). The other Wes More: One name, two fates. New York: Spiegel & Grau. ISBN: 978-0-385-52820-7) use the ideas and  concepts learned in Communication ethics literacy: Dialogue and difference and The handbook of  communication ethics as theoretical grounding for yoNow, segmentation is required not just to persuade, but to reach our © Alexey Mark/Shutterstock.com Declining importance of mass media channels chapter 8 Messages, strategies and tactics impact on how we interact and communicate. A writer at Pollock Communications, an independent agency specializing in health and wellness, summed up the impact of social media this way: “Social media has become an integral part of our everyday lives. We find and share our new favorite clothing and food brands on blogs; we meet people with similar interests on Facebook; we get our news in one sentence on Twitter; we share a picture of that awesome eggs benedict we had for brunch on Instagram and we can even find our future husband or wife on dating sites. We have an amazing ability to be connected, stay in-the-know and share our own interests, ideas and opinions on just about everything.”1 As public relations and marketing practitioners, it’s important to understand how social media is evolving. We need to grasp how people are connecting with each other, how information is passed among individuals and groups, how things go viral and how trust is built and maintained between people who may never meet in person. Much of the information we considered private only a few years ago is now broadly shared. Most people spend a significant portion of their week on social media “working” to stay connected. It almost feels like keeping up with at least a few social media channels is a daily chore. The proliferation of and accessibility of personal information through social media has changed so many things that it may be hard to remember a world without it. One of the changes that may have gone unnoticed is the higher premium that is now placed on honesty and truthfulness. We leave a pretty visible trail across social media that includes our beliefs, interests and behaviors. We are now all, in some sense, public figures. We’ll explore how to effectively use social media for message delivery in Chapter 9. But suffice it to say, social media should be considered an important and dynamic channel with untapped opportunities to explore creative and innovative tactics. This is particularly the case when your strategy involves constructing grass­ roots and word-of-mouth campaigns. Tactics The first thing that students and many practitioners do when presented with a challenge is jump to tactics. It is what communicators and marketers do the best — and the worst. We’re pretty good at developing catchy slogans, social media con­ tests, fun special events and attention-grabbing visuals. The problem is not a lack of ideas for interesting tactics; it is rather not enough careful calculation to ensure the tactics will accomplish your strategies and objectives. Tactics, or communica­ tion tools, always need to be approached in the context of your research and the problem/opportunity you’re tackling. Following the matrix approach and develop­ ing tactics only after your objectives, publics, messages and strategies have been determined will ensure they are aligned to help you accomplish your goal. The cre­ ativity required of good tactics must be carefully channeled to ensure strategic align­ ment of your campaign. 1 Pollock Communications. How Social Media Has Changed the Way We Communicate. PR Buzz, May 17, 2014: http://www.lpollockpr.com/2014/05/17/social-media-changed-way-communicate/ 137 138 chapter 8 Messages, strategies and tactics Tactics as strategic tools STRATEGY BRIEF An analytical tool that infuses strategic planning into the creation of effective tactics. Tactics are the tools — the hammer, nails, lumber and paint — you need to build a successful campaign. You can also think of them as the tasks you must perform in your campaign. The activities you undertake to implement your campaign are all tactics. Everything that costs money, aside from research and measurement, is a tactic. This is why the items that show up on your calendar and in your budget are all tactics. So regardless of how well you have planned your strategy, the success of your campaign will ultimately rest on the implementation of your tactics. The majority of business strategies fail not because they were ill-conceived, but because there was a breakdown in implementation. Their tactics either did not support the strategies or they were poorly executed. To avoid this scenario, we strongly recom­ mend you use strategy briefs for all of your tactics (see Figure 8.2). Strategy briefs are concise design tools that help you plan each tactic around your strategy. We’ll explain more about them later in this chapter. Difference between strategies and tactics One of the hardest things to work through when learning the matrix is the difference between strategies and tactics. It’s simple, really, when you think about it this way: A strategy is an approach, and a tactic is a task. You need many tasks to accomplish a strategy. A helpful question to ask is, “Can the tool be broken down any more?” If the answer is no, it’s a tactic. Mass media, for example, can be broken down into many different tactics — news release, radio actuality, public service announcement, op-ed piece — so it’s a channel within a strategy. A brochure, on the other hand, can’t be broken down any further so it’s a tactic. A special event is trickier. It can be either a strategy or a tactic. If it’s a large event with many elements to it such as a conference or the FIFA World Cup, it’s probably a strategy. If your special event is more straightforward and simple, like an employee awards ceremony, it’s probably best treated as a tactic. Diversity of tactics In addition to not always tying tactics to strategy, another problem has been the tendency to rely on the same tactics or communication tools over and over. Al­ though there is nothing wrong with reusing tactics that work well with particu­ lar publics, communicators should be careful not to fall into the routine of the processionary caterpillars described earlier. Using a tactic repeatedly sometimes causes us to select that tactic without thinking about its appropriateness to get a particular message to a particular public for a particular purpose. We fall into a pattern of selecting tactics because we’ve always used them, or because the tactic worked before. Remember to review the analytical process to select communication tools each time you design messages and strategies for publics. Change is one of the only con­ stants in business and marketing. Publics change, circumstances change, purposes change, messages change and communication channels change. If communicators stay with the same plan for the same publics without recognizing the constantly changing environment, communication efforts will miss their targets. A practitioner will be left (possibly without a job) wondering why it didn’t work this time since it had always worked before. chapter 8 °ur novel. You will need to provide:  • 10 to 12 pages  • Must use at least 10 references from your textbooks (these ideas should be paraphrase and  sometimes quoted if appropriate)  AND 10 outside journal references

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Description

After you finish reading one of the two books (Glass castle: Walls, J. (2006). The glass castle: A memoir. New York: Scribner. ISBN: 978-0-7432-4754-2 OR The other Wes More: Moore, W. (2011). The other Wes More: One name, two fates. New York: Spiegel & Grau. ISBN: 978-0-385-52820-7) use the ideas and  concepts learned in Communication ethics literacy: Dialogue and difference and The handbook of  communication ethics as theoretical grounding for yoNow, segmentation is required not just to persuade, but to reach our © Alexey Mark/Shutterstock.com Declining importance of mass media channels chapter 8 Messages, strategies and tactics impact on how we interact and communicate. A writer at Pollock Communications, an independent agency specializing in health and wellness, summed up the impact of social media this way: “Social media has become an integral part of our everyday lives. We find and share our new favorite clothing and food brands on blogs; we meet people with similar interests on Facebook; we get our news in one sentence on Twitter; we share a picture of that awesome eggs benedict we had for brunch on Instagram and we can even find our future husband or wife on dating sites. We have an amazing ability to be connected, stay in-the-know and share our own interests, ideas and opinions on just about everything.”1 As public relations and marketing practitioners, it’s important to understand how social media is evolving. We need to grasp how people are connecting with each other, how information is passed among individuals and groups, how things go viral and how trust is built and maintained between people who may never meet in person. Much of the information we considered private only a few years ago is now broadly shared. Most people spend a significant portion of their week on social media “working” to stay connected. It almost feels like keeping up with at least a few social media channels is a daily chore. The proliferation of and accessibility of personal information through social media has changed so many things that it may be hard to remember a world without it. One of the changes that may have gone unnoticed is the higher premium that is now placed on honesty and truthfulness. We leave a pretty visible trail across social media that includes our beliefs, interests and behaviors. We are now all, in some sense, public figures. We’ll explore how to effectively use social media for message delivery in Chapter 9. But suffice it to say, social media should be considered an important and dynamic channel with untapped opportunities to explore creative and innovative tactics. This is particularly the case when your strategy involves constructing grass­ roots and word-of-mouth campaigns. Tactics The first thing that students and many practitioners do when presented with a challenge is jump to tactics. It is what communicators and marketers do the best — and the worst. We’re pretty good at developing catchy slogans, social media con­ tests, fun special events and attention-grabbing visuals. The problem is not a lack of ideas for interesting tactics; it is rather not enough careful calculation to ensure the tactics will accomplish your strategies and objectives. Tactics, or communica­ tion tools, always need to be approached in the context of your research and the problem/opportunity you’re tackling. Following the matrix approach and develop­ ing tactics only after your objectives, publics, messages and strategies have been determined will ensure they are aligned to help you accomplish your goal. The cre­ ativity required of good tactics must be carefully channeled to ensure strategic align­ ment of your campaign. 1 Pollock Communications. How Social Media Has Changed the Way We Communicate. PR Buzz, May 17, 2014: http://www.lpollockpr.com/2014/05/17/social-media-changed-way-communicate/ 137 138 chapter 8 Messages, strategies and tactics Tactics as strategic tools STRATEGY BRIEF An analytical tool that infuses strategic planning into the creation of effective tactics. Tactics are the tools — the hammer, nails, lumber and paint — you need to build a successful campaign. You can also think of them as the tasks you must perform in your campaign. The activities you undertake to implement your campaign are all tactics. Everything that costs money, aside from research and measurement, is a tactic. This is why the items that show up on your calendar and in your budget are all tactics. So regardless of how well you have planned your strategy, the success of your campaign will ultimately rest on the implementation of your tactics. The majority of business strategies fail not because they were ill-conceived, but because there was a breakdown in implementation. Their tactics either did not support the strategies or they were poorly executed. To avoid this scenario, we strongly recom­ mend you use strategy briefs for all of your tactics (see Figure 8.2). Strategy briefs are concise design tools that help you plan each tactic around your strategy. We’ll explain more about them later in this chapter. Difference between strategies and tactics One of the hardest things to work through when learning the matrix is the difference between strategies and tactics. It’s simple, really, when you think about it this way: A strategy is an approach, and a tactic is a task. You need many tasks to accomplish a strategy. A helpful question to ask is, “Can the tool be broken down any more?” If the answer is no, it’s a tactic. Mass media, for example, can be broken down into many different tactics — news release, radio actuality, public service announcement, op-ed piece — so it’s a channel within a strategy. A brochure, on the other hand, can’t be broken down any further so it’s a tactic. A special event is trickier. It can be either a strategy or a tactic. If it’s a large event with many elements to it such as a conference or the FIFA World Cup, it’s probably a strategy. If your special event is more straightforward and simple, like an employee awards ceremony, it’s probably best treated as a tactic. Diversity of tactics In addition to not always tying tactics to strategy, another problem has been the tendency to rely on the same tactics or communication tools over and over. Al­ though there is nothing wrong with reusing tactics that work well with particu­ lar publics, communicators should be careful not to fall into the routine of the processionary caterpillars described earlier. Using a tactic repeatedly sometimes causes us to select that tactic without thinking about its appropriateness to get a particular message to a particular public for a particular purpose. We fall into a pattern of selecting tactics because we’ve always used them, or because the tactic worked before. Remember to review the analytical process to select communication tools each time you design messages and strategies for publics. Change is one of the only con­ stants in business and marketing. Publics change, circumstances change, purposes change, messages change and communication channels change. If communicators stay with the same plan for the same publics without recognizing the constantly changing environment, communication efforts will miss their targets. A practitioner will be left (possibly without a job) wondering why it didn’t work this time since it had always worked before. chapter 8 °ur novel. You will need to provide:  • 10 to 12 pages  • Must use at least 10 references from your textbooks (these ideas should be paraphrase and  sometimes quoted if appropriate)  AND 10 outside journal references

Do you have a similar assignment and would want someone to complete it for you? Click on
the ORDER NOW option to get instant services at LindasHelp.com. We assure you of a well
written and plagiarism free papers delivered within your specified deadline.

AD:

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CUVIE PLUS | FUME EXTRA VAPE  | CUVIE AIR  |  FUME INFINITY VAPE    | MORE XXL   | HQD   

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